The #ART component of Business-Art-Technology for 2018

B&M photo Keith Spiro article Cryer excerpt #BAT2018ART  – The #ART component of Business-Art-Technology for 2018.  The next set of #BAT2018 awards.

Previously we recognized the Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, founded in 1929, as an organization worthy of #BAT2018 note.  Now let’s explore what it takes to be heard. Winning organizations captures our imagination and move us to action.  Whether the message is subtle or loud, we take note because a vision of possibility appeals to us. Cancer is a myriad of diseases and the painstaking attention to detail and large funding requirements need solid coordination.

MIT’s Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research was formed just 8 years ago to bring together biologists, chemists and engineers. These top-of-field researchers and post docs come from focus areas of chemical and mechanical engineering, material and computer science in a collaborative approach to develop new insights and new tools to diagnose, treat and or prevent the disease.

Their ranks are filled with people elected to the National Academy of Engineering, Sciences or Medicine and five current or former faculty members have been awarded the Nobel Prize.  PhilSharp_DSC5998KSwC_©KeithSpiroPhoto I’ve had the opportunity to hear and speak with Nobel Laureate Phillip Sharp, a geneticist.  He was keynote speaker at the 8th annual Kendall Square Association meeting and used humor and video clips to drive home the message to the audience: Research is Important. The money spent today delivers life-saving miracles down the road through meticulous research and collaborative efforts.  The time-frame is a long one and the fundraising efforts to put money directly in the hands of researchers is often convoluted and confusing. Fundraising costs and overhead often eat away at the net sum delivered to a laboratory.

One way Phillip Sharp reached beyond the boundaries was to get involved with the Entertainment Industry Foundation’s Stand Up to Cancer initiative as chair of their Scientific Committee. Just imagine the exchange of skill sets when Hollywood and a Nobel Laureate collaborate.

On the ground floor of the building in which he and his collaborators work is a public gallery.B&M_Maria KSwC_20180122_153145_©KeithSpiroPhoto From the outside it looks like an art exhibit with these huge wall hangings. Executive Director Anne E. Deconinck explained that the annual Koch Institute Image Awards were established to recognize and publicly display the extraordinary visuals that can give scientists and non-scientists alike a glimpse into what was previously the nearly invisible biological world. There’s engineering and biology and a bit of humor because upon close inspection of the works, you find inspiring titles like “shape shifters: cancer cells in motion” and “Hashtag no filter: visualizing breast cancer conversations.”

The public galleries help educate and engage the non-science public. The images are amazingly effective. What might have been viewed as an everyday object to scientists with limited audience is now a cloth printed window display into their world. Most importantly, it is now understandable and viewable by the public, a necessary part of transforming health by supporting and funding research.

B&M_Maria Anne KSwC_20180122_151411_©KeithSpiroPhoto

Explaining the concept of the public gallery and annual image contest

Traveling with me on my most recent trip to the Koch Institute was Maine Acrylic artist Maria Castellano-Usery looking to gain additional insights to accelerate the fundraising efforts of her Brushstrokes with Impact™ program. Where Koch is a research institution using social media and visual displays to humanize and raise awareness for the need of everyday citizens to support research, Maria is an artist using real-time events and social media to raise funds for and increase awareness of critical programs in the underfunded areas where an engaged citizenry rather than government entities can make a difference.

B&M_Anne Maria KSwC_20180122_152413_©KeithSpiroPhoto

Artist Maria Castellano-Usery & Ki Executive Director Anne E. Deconinck

Both The Koch Institute and Maria Castellano-Usery create strong community engagement through social media, posted content and video. They key in on effective communication with a clear, concise message that uses visuals. Each in their own way are raising awareness and encouraging a community to support and take action. Their work today insures tomorrow’s health miracles will happen.

Business, Art and Technology are working seamlessly here.  The internet is a great equalizer – and amplifier.  It doesn’t matter if you are a large institution with lots of walls to overcome or an individual contributor with a message to share,  B- A – T spell success on many levels.

For compelling use of Art, I give a #BAT2018 award to artists like Maria and institutions like the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research.


The Business component of #BAT2018 Business-Art-Technology

B&M feb 2018 JAX

BUSINESS  – The #Business component of #BAT2018 -Business-Art-Technology for 2018

I launched the year with a column talking about going to #BAT in 2018 and I’ve received a whole lot of feedback and acknowledgement that I’ve touched on something important. The speed of change and the need for human adaptation leaves many of us trying to figure it all out.

The most oft asked question has been for me to give examples of organizations that do a good job integrating business, art and technology to stand out above the crowd in this disconnected communications environment. Most appropriately – my best examples come from Maine & Boston.  Coincidentally, they are both making a difference in human health.

My very first #BAT2018 award goes to The Jackson Laboratory headquartered in Bar Harbor Maine. Founded in 1929 they are an independent, nonprofit biomedical research organization who dares to assert their vision imagining “a world free of devastating disease.”

I have no insider’s view here. I am aware of them because of my work with biomed and medtech research organizations. Mostly, however, I continue to learn about them because of their internet and social media activity. This organization has integrated business art and technology with a very human approach to everything they do. I have never really “met” anyone from that organization and yet I feel like I know the CEO and their social media strategist very well. In reality – that discovery of @jacksonlab on twitter – led to a series of real time exchanges and my warm inclusion as a friend of their social media community. Community by its very nature must have dialogue between members. Community is not a brand pitching every single moment with outbound broadcasts. Jackson Labs acknowledges and responds to online comments and makes it fun to be involved with what they do and what they offer.

One very popular item with me was their 2018 calendar. It’s a salute to a dozen famous artists thru a wickedly wonderful re-interpretation of their work. Roy Lichtenstein, Peter Max and Idelle Weber highlight the lab’s commitment to women in science as well as the joy of discovery while science and lab mice remain center stage.

b&m20180125_095548_W ©KeithSpiroPhoto

Does this poster style look familiar?  The most popular mouse in the house delivered in a clever Andy Warhol style.

A business is successful because of its people. When it comes to Jackson Labs, I’ve seen some team photos online and I’ve looked at their job postings.  The employees clearly reflect the wide diversity you should expect of an impactful organization. I’ve said it before. You either are or are not diverse. There is no maybe and no hiding behind geography, availability or other excuses.

Business attitude is also readily revealed in job postings. Collaborative and Interdisciplinary, Jackson Laboratory ideal candidates pay attention to coveted values of: Integrity, People, One Team, Excellence, Innovation and Stewardship. Job descriptions acknowledge that every position contributes to JAX’s mission of discovering precise genomic solutions and empowering the global biomedical community in a shared quest to improve human health.

WOW! Whether its research or media and communications, cross disciplined creativity is encouraged and their benefits package reinforces the expectations and opportunities at every step.

JAX is one of those best practice examples of integration of Art & Technology, Social media and Community, Outreach and Diversity in everything they do. In a world full of noise, they are Creative & their mission is  compelling.

 Follow them online on Facebook and Twitter

You can support their work!  Click Here! They will gladly accept donations. You can make a tribute gift, have your business  step up and partner with them. You can even help fund a scientist!


Next installment, we’ll take a look at the other end of the rail line down by Boston.

b&m20180122_151358_KSPwC ©KeithSpiroPhotoAnother organization devoted to integrative approaches to health. Technology, depicted here, looks like something out of a Peter Max poster and they too are amazing.

The Creatives

The Creatives

bakerArtist KSPwC_DSC5353_©KeithSpiroPhoto

The baker of USA has a website, a craft and a portfolio

When I look back on five years of connecting urban & rural Business, Art & Technology in a monthly column called The Boston & Maine Connection,  I clearly see both the power of tight communities and the vibrancy of large cities.  As my connections have expanded globally so too has my sense of how to utilize technology for the good of community.  Rapid technological changes have impacted both our sense of what makes up a community as well as how we approach communication and commerce.  Today, certain aspects of small town living apply across the web. People in small towns have always known that your personal history follows you forever. The locals never forget who you were and what you did and now – neither does Facebook nor Google.

The opportunity for global cooperation and competition has never been greater. As the Gregorian calendar turned the page to 2018, I took note that Gujarat India had already celebrated Diwali and it’s new year and Brisbane Australia & Dublin Ireland leapt  into 2018 fifteen and five hours respectively ahead of the USA. Whether you think of the world as competitive or your opportunity as collaborative, know that Australia is ranked as #1 for what I see as the most pivotal of all groups – the Creatives. The rising Creative Class is an area for intense but oftentimes overlooked opportunities.

The Creative Class includes the digital native who is comfortable around technology as a skillset as well as others who have learned to merge art and creative skills into the technology marketplace. Quite frankly, not many tech people can grasp the intangibles and boundary-free thinking that true Creatives have and in today’s fast paced world, Creatives are more important than ever.

Richard Florida wrote a book in 2002 positing the rise of this socio-economic class in a post-urbanized age. The battle for world class cities vs. the rest of the population will continue to play out on the ground as well as in the cloud. You may have heard of the “gig economy.” Well, it will be the Creatives who become the glue binding together our humanity and the machine world.

Here’s a quote from Steven Jobs in his introduction of the iPad2 in 2011:

“Technology alone is not enough—

it’s technology married with liberal arts, married with the humanities, that yields us the results that make our heart sing.”

Business cries out for new markets and new customers and laments the difficulty of being heard in a digital world full of noise. With our “swipe left or swipe right” attention spans – it will be the visual and the creative that catches and holds our attention.

As brands seek to dominate and capture new clients and as technology moves people into a sales funnel and as artificial intelligence tends to predict your choices, the opportunity to succeed may very well come down to the human element of – that which catches your attention, – wins!

Australian writer and brand strategist Jess Thoms defined Creative Tech as the combination of Technology with Art and Design to create better experiences, products and brands. She goes on to say  “Working in creative tech doesn’t mean you need to learn how to code, or suddenly become a robotics engineer. It’s about the application of your creative skills and ideas to a technical platform so it performs better. Technology is made for humans, after all. So who better than storytellers, artists, poets, and psychologists to make this technology more personable?”

Perhaps the name Mark Cuban is more familiar?  Jess quotes him as saying liberal arts degrees are the future. And indeed, I agree.  I have long been an advocate of liberal arts education in a science driven world. Our humanity depends on it!

If you are a Creative, you need to find your way onto tech teams – those AI and robotics people need you to insure the inevitable future will function better.  Humanities shape language, psychology colors empathy, and trust comes from repetition, consistently, of the best experiences.  Starving artists are a thing of the past. The future belongs to those who can bring understanding to the rest of us and you will be paid handsomely for doing so.  #BAT2018

creatives CRYER header cut for blogs SM

My Three Words: 2018 Going to BAT

Going to BAT in 2018  – My Three Words – Business Art Technology #BAT2018 #my3words

Continuing a long standing tradition started by Waterville Maine native Chris Brogan, I have been starting out each year with three words to guide my success in the year ahead rather than a series of New Year resolutions that are too easily broken. There is genius behind Chris’ process in having three words always there to focus attention and minimize distraction.

Last year my words were Focused, Filtered and Fluid and they each played a strong role in keeping me on my plan and not getting overly distracted by all the incoming noise of today’s internet experience.

photo by Keith Spiro poet for hire NYCFor 2018 my words to navigate by are Business, Art and Technology and in a unique twist, I will be mindful that all three are intricately interwoven in any successful endeavor in our tumultuous cultural and political climate.  They fit well with my personal goals of learning, sharing and enjoying the use of my creative skills and my art daily for family, friends and business.  Previously, my three words could stand alone and reflect totally different considerations but with the news streamed across our devices, 2018 is the year where the best way for an individual to be seen, be heard or be found will be to employ and deploy the best of skills, design and technology in everything we do.  I truly believe that we each can accomplish nearly anything we set our mind to more easily than ever.  While strategy and community building is the methodology, it will be the business mindset along with technology and a creative arts touch that will permit great achievements.

Whether you are acting as an individual on a mission, or on behalf of a marketing agency, a small business or a big brand, you need to recognize the significant change in human information gathering and activation.  We have less power to sell but more power to influence with best results occurring when someone self-activates for your cause because they have accumulated enough information and desire to take action on your behalf. Word of mouth sharing by friends and other trusted influencers is what drives the bus these days. Marketers spend a lot of time and a lot of your money to measure and track influence but the reality is much simpler than the experts want you to believe.

How you make others feel combined with being part of a community will determine your true ability to get things done.  You don’t need 10,000 “followers” you only need a small core group who have been touched by and affected by you to take action to a dramatically powerful result.  “Me too”  is a real emotional trigger for more than just today’s firestorm. In calmer times, the inclusive nature of a group will be just as powerful for a wide range of changes that can be brought to the forefront.

By moving beyond the disjointed nature of communications today and focusing on nurturing a community of like-minded souls, you can turn most any cause into a movement and be seen, heard and found. For me, 2018 represents my concerted effort to insure that my business acumen and my human story blend well every day.

Business – including the business of life, is getting things done in an organized and team driven manner. You don’t have to do it alone. There are others who share your thinking and will help if only you reach out and ask.

Art –  We humans are influenced by our emotions. We take action because we are happy, angry, sad, excited or a whole lot of other nuanced emotional feelings. The arts are a sometimes overlooked but fantastic way to draw attention and engage support. Long before the internet, humans depended on creative and artistic skills to communicate to a broader audience. People of letters and visual artists galvanized us into action through visual and oral storytelling. Stories move us.  Art is an integral part of what makes a society whole and art is powerful in creating dialogue and change. The winning organization is one that captures our imagination and moves us to action.  Sometimes it is subtle, sometimes not. But, always – it is the artist who crafts a vision in ways that first cause us to stop and take note.  Hire an artist and be amazed at what can be accomplished by rising above all the noise.

Technology – is no longer an option, it is an integral part of most every set of actions. Rather than be lulled into the passive “swipe right/swipe left” mentality of the followers, take action and use technology to gather your community, inform them and move them to coordinated action. We don’t have to go it alone. We don’t have to be the product being sold. As social media matures into social business, we too can use the tools and compete with the Goliath of big funders with the deft creative skills of a David. Time to use our voices and our creative talents and make a difference.

BAT2018perfect JaxMiceWarholTweetHere’s my first pick for an organization going to #BAT2018- The Jackson Labs make a huge difference in global health – and I have both intersected with & followed their work for years. They are a best practice example of integration of Art & Technology, Social media and Community, Outreach and Diversity in everything they do. Check out the client calendar they offer. Creative – compelling. Follow them.       Support their work!

Now its your turn – Pick any three words share them with me if you like (I’ll publish them online ) – but be sure to spend a few minutes daily insuring that your beacon and path is clear and make it a great year.

Conversational Web, AI & a Trillion Dollar Bubble

The conversational Web, AI and a trillion-dollar bubble.

At MoNage, we explored the future of the conversational web and the convergence of computing, cryptocurrency, AI, Communications, messaging and their underlying ecosystems.  I spoke about trillion dollar opportunities and my concerns that tomorrow’s conversational web may well be compromised by today’s failure to fully encompass diverse tech teams.

#MoNage Keith Spiro Barbara Clarke photo

Joining me on stage was Barbara Clarke, an economist and co-founder of The Impact Seat. Together we read Letters to MoNage – a real time compilation of comments coming out of the multi day presentations and together we represented a clear visual cue of diversity in front of a mostly male audience.

I challenged developers, corporate leaders and brand advisors to deeply consider the work of Eli Pariser who grew up in Maine and delivered an impressive TED talk called The Filter Bubble.

In a book of the same name, he outlined a growing concern for the web isolating us rather than bringing us together. He spoke of the filter bubble as intellectual isolation. That the personalization of Google search and personalized Facebook, Twitter and other “community” feeds, end up “showing us what they think we want to see and not what we need to see.”

He spoke about algorithmic editors needing to have human ethics embedded and not just using a relevance index to feed us what we like but also to include exposure to what challenges us or what will even make us uncomfortable. There is a need to seek differences and not just settle for reinforcement of your favorite point of view.  Most importantly he stressed a need to see future online interactions built transparent enough so we can see the rules of what gets through and what does not get through to our personalized feed. If not, then we risk making these bubbles of isolation even more pronounced than they are today.

So that is why I challenge the developer community to test for what I call trillion-dollar missing links. Because, in every process they create, they need to examine, more closely, potential points of failure in:

  • Efficiencies –which might really stand for creating exclusions
  • Personalization – which David Meerman Scott calls the “Enemy of Serendipity”
  • Experiential – if a wide human range of expectations and cultural nuances are ignored
  • Hidden Bias – goes well beyond the word – diversity – (a word which causes some eyes to glaze over) Hidden Bias is easily found in areas of age, ethnic and gender exclusion or absence (from the building process).

actually that 1 T monage twitter captureHere are just two simple and visible examples of concern:

  1. Latinx. Nielsen- a company that prides itself on reaching inside consumers and homes -points to the projected Latinx buying power of nearly $1.5 Trillion. Annually. With 86% of that community saying the woman is the primary shopper, here are clear gender and ethnic differences to consider.  Do you understand their cultural norms?  They are not on Linked In. They have begun to create their own social media/social business platforms. Do you understand why? I hope teams look into it. This disconnected bubble is worth $1.5 Trillion a year.
  2. Baby Boomers. Let me speak as a member of a different Trillion Dollar bubble. Baby Boomers.  Each year, for the next thirty years, we are looking at the potential transfer of wealth of nearly $1 Trillion dollars. One Trillion Dollars a year.  Look closely at our experiential web & AI interactions.  There’s a backlash happening. Note the mentions of Facebook Timeouts and a more shrill shouting rather than dialog taking place nearly everywhere.  We are all quite capable of breaking relationships with our banks and the airlines we use. The old fashioned hooks that held us to a business relationship are gone. I want to have an enjoyable user experience. I will find it – if not with your business – than somewhere else.

How many of us have had enough of struggling to insure accuracy of what we write in text messages on our smaller handheld devices? There’s something about autocomplete that leaves me wanting. Predictive completion is not my friend. Chatbots that don’t understand my nuances annoy me enough to find another vendor.  I find this transactional drag on communications totally unacceptable. And so, the word trust begins to grow as a decision point for my spend. If I don’t trust you or your system, I will not be your customer. Ever. My future personal chatbot will duly note that and may block you no differently than today’s email spam. Advertisers take note.

So, here’s a very simplified approach to fixing problems that exist and to pre-emptively prevent future gaffs. Just look around you. Look at your project team, look at the consultants that you hired and the people running surveys for you. If you look around and everyone looks like you and the individuals delivering the message and answers you’ve asked for looks just like you, You. Have. A. Problem.  You don’t need any more bubble based positive reinforcement, you need to be concerned about the people who are not in the room with you.

Don’t let an unpleasant user experience result in the customer or human intermediary shutting down on one another.

Diverse teams deliver better results.

Diverse leadership insures more points of view are heard and acted upon.

Diversity should be obvious.

Your project/business/appeal either is or is not.

There is no maybe.

Keith Spiro Boston & Maine Connection news column photo

This post is an expansion on the article originally appearing in The Cryer.


Urgent v. Important; A Facebook Time-out

Urgent vs. Important – or equally well known in parenting and business circles as the Facebook timeout. I’ve been hearing from many folks lately with complaints about valuable time wasted or lost but only realized once they’ve emerged from one of the many daily trips down the rabbit hole of social media. Much of the criticism is pointed at Facebook where daily usage by over 1 billion people does appear to make it the watering hole everybody must stop at to take a daily drink. Some call it Facebook Fatigue. You emerge dissatisfied and find yourself diverted from your daily goals.

Now is the right time to revisit the growing dilemma of dealing with Urgent vs. Important tasks in your day. Let’s start with an internet search (of course) of the phase “urgent vs. important.” I was surprised to see “Eisenhower Box” among the top offerings along with a ten year old Harvard Business Review article. But look up “Facebook sabbatical” or “Facebook timeout” and a massive variety of choices are offered up.

Eisenhower Box.uploadjpgThe Eisenhower Box was a wonderful representation of how to process “inbound” demands on our time and it represented the “how” of time management skills and techniques in a world long vanished. Today, few people ever lift their faces up from the device that has become as addictive as opioids. This device (I hesitate to call it a phone) is where selfies become the default camera mode and human beings can become human doings if they’re not careful.

The addictive nature of these devices plays to the very human need to be acknowledged by others. This is the principle that most social media platforms exploit and therefore it is important to explore the “why” of today’s dilemma of Urgent vs. Important

Seth Godin rightly points out that responding to Urgent makes us feel competent – we must reply to an email – we want to acknowledge another immediately upon seeing their post. And it is so easy to act. A single touch of “like” or “swipe” triumphantly meets the urgency head on.

But is it important, this inbound missive?  Does it help create something of value?  Doing important work takes time and continuous focus.  Developing a drug to combat deadly disease takes years if not decades. Building an inclusive society that doesn’t leave behind the poor, the elderly and the differently-abled means taking risks and standing out from everyone else.

If Urgent makes us feel competent then important is likely to be a time elongated task shadowed by fear and uncertainty of outcome. Will the project succeed? Will the time invested prove valuable? Will real jobs be created? We may not know for years if the path taken is the right one to a measurable success. Would Thomas Edison be encouraged in his work today?

He was famously known for saying “I have not failed. I’ve just found ten thousand ways that won’t work” on his lifelong way to creating 1,093 patented inventions. But equally important was his belief that “The most necessary task of civilization is to teach people how to think.”

Are we thinking about why disruption in the marketplace is so rewarded? One should question today’s reliance on MVP (minimum viable product) that is often an excuse to build a concept company to be acquired or flipped. Is the focus really a scalable startup that will deliver the creation of important jobs for the future? We are just a few years away from self-driving vehicles and chatbots taking over many tasks while providing predictably “correct” answers to our questions. But as business and society moves forward, the most important questions will not be answerable by search.

Consider then, the heretics who want more than just a world dummied down into the simplicity of swipe right, swipe left.  A former manager of mine talked about chipping away each day at the big tasks – of building trust, of being present and listening more than speaking.

When it comes to “Important” will you take the time to build the future – or will you swipe away the hours with all the idle time soon to be presented to you?

I’d like to hear your thoughts.

Video is Now

Amanda Palmer sings with Keith Spiro

Why video? Why now? Because studies by Animoto, Google and Hubspot support the proposition that marketing is moving to video and visuals at an ever accelerating pace. Here are some baseline statistics:

4X as many customers would rather watch a video about a product than read about it. (Animoto, 2015)

Almost 50% of internet users look for videos related to a product or service before visiting a store. (Google, 2016)

53% of smartphone users feel more favorable towards companies whose mobile sites or apps provide instructional video content. (Google, 2015)

Some 45% of us watch more than an hour of Facebook or YouTube videos a week (HubSpot, 2016) and

An astounding 100 million hours of video are watched everyday on Facebook (techCrunch 2016).

82% of Twitter users watch video content on twitter  and 90% of Twitter video views are on mobile (Twitter 2015) Source:

So, the message is clear. We have moved into an age where people watch and listen rather than read and we tend to prefer to consume information in video sound bites.  More video is posted each day than can be consumed in any one lifetime!  Most people agree that a video of one minute or shorter duration is the generally preferred length of engagement.

How do you get to participate in this movement without investing a whole lot of money?

Today it is easier than ever to create your own video broadcast.  Streaming platforms are everywhere and the simplest one is Facebook Live streaming. Click a button or two and you’re off to the races. Want a more professional look? Take the time to plan out a script.  As so many of the early adopters will tell you – just “press start” and do it. You can bring in the professional teams later. Most consumers today look for authenticity over commercial polish.

But beware, 70%  say they dislike mobile ads and 81% of consumers have closed a browser or exited a website because of a pop-up ad. So don’t buy into some fancy proposal that uses interruption techniques to push something in front of potential customers.  As I have said many times before, there are new rules of sales and marketing at work today. Content is king but it needs to be content that is useful to the consumer and not click bait or disruptive if you want to make a positive impression.

Today, video accounts for more than 50% of all search online. Many customers would prefer to see a video of a product in action before they get into the buying mode or walk into a store. Is your business ready to inform and educate rather than sell and push?

Here’s how to get started with video if you are not already using it in business:

An easy first step is to reach out into the 1 billion daily users of Facebook and try Facebook Live. You can narrate a story, a product introduction or a client testimonial. Be aware that this happens in real time and goes live immediately. So start simple. Keep to a particular goal and stay on only long enough for a few friends to check in on what you’re up to. Then shut it off. It doesn’t matter if only a few people were there live. The power of streaming is that it will be there for others to come across or for Facebook algorithms to serve up to others.

There are many new tools to help integrate video into your business. Your basic smart phone today can record video that you can post as is or edit for later uploading to Twitter, Facebook or YouTube.

Here are just a few ways to introduce video to your customers:

Introduce a new product or a new employee.

Tell a story about the business or the culture and interview someone who is comfortable in front of a camera.

You can even create visual press releases and updates from senior management.

As you become more comfortable with the basics, you will want to consider things like lighting and backdrops. Here’s a great video from Wistia with tips on how to setup your own video studio for less than $100.

If you’re still shaking your head but game to try it, give me a shout.  I can put on my professional photographer hat and get you going faster than you think possible. Pay attention to the statistics – it is worth your investment of time and grappling with the learning curve.